Local History


A Snippet of Dublin History (Part 7) – Newgate Prison

There was a square tower located between Newgate and Gormond’s Gate, described as being four stories high, sixteen feet square and three feet thick. This tower belonged to a Richard Browne in the 17th century and was known as “Browne’s Castle”. Subsequently, it was converted into an... 

Keeping Old Traditions Alive – The McCanns Of James Street

  If I grew up in California I would probably aspire to be part the entertainment industry. If I grew up in England I might want to be a footballer, but I’m Irish, so growing up in Ireland the jewel in the crown was always the public house. It might sound weird but we all know it’s true,... 

My Memories of Dublin

I remember Dublin Town When I walked down Eden Quay And I listened to a tinker boy As he sang a song for me He sang so sweetly on his own It brought a tear from my eye He put so much feeling in his song I could see the “Croppy Boy” He finished off his first song Followed by “The Rising of the... 

Historical finds uncovered in Road Works on Thomas Street

The Fololowing article was written by an archaeologist named Antoine, we are currently trying reach him for further information. Fascinating Reading.  This April just gone, road works on James’/Thomas Streets have uncovered the foundations of mostly 18th century buildings facing James’ Gate... 

Ode To a Childhood Visiting Dublin Zoo

Expectations were high Our thoughts were new Our plans were exciting We’d bunk into the zoo The fence was high Our trousers new And scale this height We had to do We shimmed over The barbed wire fence The arse of my trousers Was no defence Inside we dropped We knew not where Could we be in? A timber... 

Memory of Nelson’s Pillar by Tony Gorman

Another Charming Poem By Tony, You can’t help but enjoy them!  Memory of Nelson’s Pillar 8th May 2014 by/Tony Gorman I remember dear old Dublin back in my boyhood days So far back that in the westerns was a bearded Gabby Hayes And old Nelson on his pillar standing proud and tall and high As... 

A Snippet of Dublin History (Part 6) – Werburgh Street

  Werburgh Street derived its name from a church erected there after the Anglo – Norman settlement, which was dedicated to Saint Werburgh, patron of Chester.  St. Werburgh’s is mentioned in a Papal letter of 1179 and, on the night of Saint Colum’s festival in 1311, a great part... 

A Poem about Dublin’s Characters by Tony Gorman

The characters of old Dublin we’re proud of them all As their ghosts on the websites give us all a rallying call Reaching out on still photos and in old movie strips as well Revived from the archives for the stories that they tell Of the Diceman and his movements deliberately slow With his face all... 

A Poem about Bang Bang, by Tony Gorman

This charming poem was left on our comments section and I felt it deserved its own post. Wonderful! Alias Bang Bang (Thomas Dudley) a true Dublin character 17th March 2014 In 1906 a new babe was born Into troublesome days his life was forlorn He was born into poverty, suppressed by his life Overladen... 

A Snippet of Dublin History (Part 5) – Audeon’s Church

  Audoen was a pious man who was elected bishop of Rouen in 640 and died on the 24th of August 683. After his death many miracles were attributed to him. The Abbey Church of Rouen which was dedicated to him, housed the remains of most of the rulers of Normandy and also the heart of Richard the... 

A Snippet of Dublin History (Part 4) – The Cornmarket Area

  In 1308, Jean le Decer, Mayor of Dublin, erected a marble water cistern at his own expense, for the benefit of the citizens. This cistern was viewed with awe, as it’s like was never seen before in the city.  Newgate Street was situated to the west of the cistern, this street was named... 

Times Past – A look at old fashioned manners – The Isabella Beeton Story

Isabella Beeton Isabella Mary Beeton was born on the 12th of March 1836, in London. Her father died when she was young and her mother remarried a man who had four daughters of his own. Isabella became the eldest of a family of twenty one children, this included these four girls. She spent two years at... 

A Snippet of Dublin History (Part 3) – High Street Area

This High Cross Stood at High Street in Dublin 8 (Image taken from the UCD Library Collection) High Street is stated to have been the boundary, agreed in the 2nd Century, when Ireland was divided between Eoghan, King of Munster, and Conn of the Hundred Battles. It was built on very marshy ground and... 

The Origins Of Dublin City – Birth Of A Capital

I’m sure we all know that Dublin City was founded by Vikings 988AD (which refers to the year of its status upgrade but not of its beginning as a town). That bit of knowledge is celebrated by a number of milk bottles that survive in the dusty wing of attics up and down the country. The city’s beginnings... 

Could A Liberties Museum Suit The Cork Street Park?

Preface: Just To be Clear, My Own Position On A Cork Street Park Due to the articles I’ve written about the potential Cork Street Park, I’ve received some interesting ideas, via email and Facebook, for the use of the space that’s available, and I plan on presenting some of them here... 

Local History Series – The Royal Hospital Kilmainham

In 1545, the archbishop obtained a license to unite the Church of St. John the Baptist of Kilmainham and that of St. James, both without the suburbs, to the Church of St. Catherine, within the suburbs of Dublin. In 1556, the Lord Lieutenant Fitzwalter kept his court at Kilmainham and it was here that... 

St. Patrick: The Story Of The Green Saint

Somewhere between 410 – 420 AD St Patrick first came to Ireland as a slave. Irish raiders had been attacking the British western coastline for centuries particularly in places such as Wales and Cornwall, they captured a young Patrick and brought him back to Ireland where he spent the next 6 years... 

Local History Series – Dublin Zoo

On Thursday the 1st of September 1831 at 9 o’clock in the morning, Dublin Zoological Gardens opened its doors to the public for the first time. By the mid 1830’s, the city’s population was about 200,000 and approximately 40,000 people were visiting the Zoo each year. The entrance was quite expensive,... 

Is There A Santa Claus? (New York Sun, 1897)

This famous editorial first appeared in the New York Sun on September 21st, 1897. We take pleasure in answering at once and thus prominently the communication below, expressing at the same time our great gratification that its faithful author is numbered among the friends of The Sun. Dear Editor, I... 

Christmas Traditions & Lore

Christmas, more than any other festival, has more worldwide customs and traditions. Red Christmas Candles Long ago in Ireland, each household had a long, red Christmas candle burning in the window. This was to light the way for Mary and Joseph, on their journey to Bethlehem. Before the advent of supermarkets,... 
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